Yiddish

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Yiddish Meaning and Definition in Dictionary

Definitions from Wordnet 2.0


  • a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script

Definitions from Wiktionary


  • a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script

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Yiddish Meaning and Definition in Wikipedia


Yiddish is a language used by some Jews. At first it was a dialect of the German language which Jews began to use in Europe about a thousand years ago. It was (and is) used in the United States, especially in New York. Most of its words are of German origin. Also, Yiddish has many words from Hebrew and Slavic languages, notably Polish. Yiddish is usually written in Hebrew characters.

In the whole world, Yiddish is spoken by about 3 million people. It is mainly spoken by Hasidic Jews.



Yiddish Sample Sentences in News


  • Yiddish Book Center summer program open to high school students
    AMHERST, Mass. – The Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Mass. is now accepting applications for its 2015 Great Jewish Books Summer Program for high school students. This will be the fourth year of the weeklong program, which introduces students to a wide range of modern Jewish novelists, poets, and short-story writers. All students accepted to [&hellip The post Yid Read more on this news related to 'Yiddish'
  • Blog Post: StoryCorps Interview: Yiddish Book Center
    Amy S. Klein's father, Arthur S. Klein, recently passed away. Amy talks to Christa Whitney about her father's personal connection to the Yiddish Book Center, where Christa works and where Arthur started volunteering as a docent at age 82. Read more on this news related to 'Yiddish'
  • Yiddish songs lift wistful Berlin film fest opener β€˜To Life!’
    Ruth Weintraub has mastered the art of keeping her Jewish past at bay. Evicted from her beloved Berlin apartment of 35 years and placed in ugly, unwelcoming public housing, she opts to stop struggling. Read more on this news related to 'Yiddish'

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