Frame-up

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Dictionary Meaning and Definition on 'Frame-up'

Frame-up Meaning and Definition from WordNet (r) 2.0
    frame-up n : an act that incriminates someone on a false charge [syn: setup]
Frame-up Meaning and Definition from Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
    Frame-up \Frame"-up`\, n. A conspiracy or plot, esp. for a malicious or evil purpose, as to incriminate a person on false evidence. [Slang]
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Wikipedia Meaning and Definition on 'Frame-up'


A frameup or setup is an American term referring to the act of framing someone, that is, providing false evidence or false testimony in order to falsely prove someone guilty of a crime.

Sometimes the person who is framing someone else is the actual perpetrator of the crime. In other cases it is an attempt by law enforcement to get around due process. Motives include getting rid of political dissidents or "correcting" what they see as the court's mistake. Some lawbreakers will try to claim they were framed as a defense strategy. The term comes from the criminal subculture, with an early version being the claim that "someone is trying to put me in the frame," as in a picture frame.

Frameups in labor disputes sometimes swings public opinion one way or the other. During a strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts, police acting on a tip discovered dynamite and blamed it on the union. National media echoed an anti-union message. Later the police revealed that the dynamite had been wrapped in a magazine addressed to the son of the former mayor. The man had received an unexplained payment from the largest of the employers. Exposed, the plot swung public sympathy to the union.

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