Aves

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Dictionary Meaning and Definition on 'Aves'

Aves Meaning and Definition from WordNet (r) 2.0
    Aves n : birds [syn: class Aves]
Aves Meaning and Definition from Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)
    Aves \A"ves\, n. pl. [L., pl. of avis bird.] (Zo["o]l.) The class of Vertebrata that includes the birds. Note: Aves, or birds, have a complete double circulation, oviparous, reproduction, front limbs peculiarly modified as wings; and they bear feathers. All existing birds have a horny beak, without teeth; but some Mesozoic fossil birds (Odontornithes) had conical teeth inserted in both jaws. The principal groups are: Carinat[ae], including all existing flying birds; Ratit[ae], including the ostrich and allies, the apteryx, and the extinct moas; Odontornithes, or fossil birds with teeth. Note: The ordinary birds are classified largely by the structure of the beak and feet, which are in direct relation to their habits. See Beak, Bird, Odontonithes.
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Wikipedia Meaning and Definition on 'Aves'


Birds (class Aves) are feathered, winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals. There are around 10,000 living species, making them the most speciose class of tetrapod vertebrates. They inhabit ecosystems across the globe, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Extant birds range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 150–200 Ma (million years ago), and the earliest known bird is the Late Jurassic Archaeopteryx, c 150–145 Ma. Most paleontologists regard birds as the only clade of dinosaurs to have survived the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event approximately 65.5 Ma.

Modern birds are characterised by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a lightweight but strong skeleton. All living species of birds have wings - the now extinct flightless Moa of New Zealand were the only exceptions. Wings are evolved forelimbs, and most bird species can fly, with some exceptions including ratites, penguins, and a number of diverse endemic island species. Birds also have unique digestive and respiratory systems that are highly adapted for flight. Some birds, especially corvids and parrots, are among the most intelligent animal species; a number of bird species have been observed manufacturing and using tools, and many social species exhibit cultural transmission of knowledge across generations.

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Aves Sample Sentences in News


  • Jimenez: Experiencing hospitality in the sky
    LAST Thursday, the prestigious Thunderbugs Bacolod Motorcycle Club held its turn-over rites and golden anniversary celebration at Sugarland Hotel with former banker and big biker Lito Aves sworn in as club president. Read more on this news related to 'Aves'
  • Police seek missing 14-year-old boy
    Toronto police are asking the public for help finding a boy who has been missing since Saturday. Jesse Sacobie, 14, was last seen at 9 a.m. Saturday in the Danforth and Woodbine Aves. area. He is described as white, 5-foot-7, 125 pounds, with brown eyes and straight brown collar-length hair. He wore a black sports jacket with an Adidas logo and a black baseball ha Read more on this news related to 'Aves'
  • Experiencing hospitality in the sky
    LAST Thursday, the prestigious Thunderbugs Bacolod Motorcycle Club held its turn-over rites and golden anniversary celebration at Sugarland Hotel with former banker and big biker Lito Aves sworn in as club president. *** This club is composed of motorcycle enthusiasts who ride the most elegant big... Read more on this news related to 'Aves'

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